The Curse of KK Hammond: Exclusive interview

The Curse of KK Hammond: Exclusive interview

Deep in the woods with The Curse of KK Hammond

Meet The Curse of KK Hammond

K.K. is a multiple iTunes chart topping slide guitarist and singer-songwriter living deep in the back woods of the U.K. She takes her influence from the Delta Blues players of the 1930s infusing her music with alternative rock and Southern Gothic horror for a uniquely dark and dirty sound.

The Sound of The Curse of KK Hammond

1 In Music: What is unique about you and your music?

The Curse of KK Hammond [KKH]: My intention is to keep the spirit of Roots Blues and old Folk murder ballads alive whilst applying a more contemporary approach to my sound and delivery.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?The Curse Of KK Hammond IMG_6447-edit

KKH: My music reflects the artists I have spent a lot of time listening to from a variety of Metal acts, to the Roots Blues artists of the 1930s to Rock and Folk acts like Tom Waits and Nick Cave. My audience has an interesting split down the middle of Metal and Rock fans on one side and traditional blues fans on the other!

1 In Music: When did you realize you were going to make music professionally?

KKH: It started out as a fun hobby for me playing slide guitar on my couch!  I never expected to attain the sort of following I have! I spent many years working professionally with horses but after the success of my debut album ‘Death Roll Blues’ I decided to go into music full time and have never been happier.

The Inspiration of The Curse of KK Hammond

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

The Curse of KK Hammond [KKH]: As a teenager, I listened to a lot of heavy music ranging from Slayer to acts such as Alice in Chains. I always had a taste for Folk music, Bluegrass and of course, Blues. These days, I mostly listen to my favorite Roots Blues artists such as Skip James, Son House, Robert Johnson, Charley Patton and Blind Willie Johnson. I also love to listen to small, up and contemporary Blues and Folk acts.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

KKH: Van Tastik. He is a contemporary Blues artist whose music and voice I’m obsessed with! His following is steadily growing but I feel he deserves a great deal more recognition for his beautiful music and fantastic live shows, he really knows how to get an audience going!

The Curse of KK Hammond: KKH talks Passion

less genuinely is more…

1 In Music: And what about you? How do you get your audiences going and how do you prepare for your performances?

The Curse of KK Hammond [KKH]: The Curse Of K.K. HammondI’m breaking the mold somewhat by not playing live! I used to when I played in Metal bands some years back but it was never something I enjoyed. I’m a real-life hermit who lives deep in the woods away from the hussle and bussle and hate having all eyes on me. My passion is to pour all my available time and energy into creating music in my home studio. I tend to work very slowly on new tracks so don’t really have time for tours. I don’t want to find myself in a position in which I’d have to make my fans wait even longer for new releases, and I am so grateful for the incredible patience they have already!

1 In Music: So what do you do, deep in the woods away from the hussle and bussle when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

KK: I have a keen interest in herpetology and love to go on field trips to see animals in the wild. I keep pet snakes which are my little (or not so little in the case of my boa constrictor!) pride and joy! I also love to explore the backwoods where I live.

The Curse of KK Hammond: Inspiration from KKH

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

I don’t think you can have success without satisfaction and appreciation for what you are doing.

The Curse of KK Hammond [KKH]: It’s absolutely wonderful having fans and streams but if you don’t love and have passion for what you do then what is it really worth? Coming at it from another angle, I think having even a small handful of folks out there who genuinely love what you do is a gift and what I personally consider even one person truly adoring your music success. I guess if that one person becomes tens of thousands and it helps pay the bills then even better!

1 In Music: Fair enough. What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

KKH: When I set up my home studio, I tried to get super fancy with my set up, a multitude of mics to record a single track on a song and various embellishments to ensure I had what I thought was the most professional equipment and set up. As I progressed, I realised that less genuinely was more and ended up selling all my expensive mics in favor of a simple, cheap one that did the job just right. Especially when you are playing simple music like Roots Blues on resonator guitars, you just don’t need to go crazy on set up in order to have a superb sound!

What is the next for the Curse of KK Hammond?

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

The Curse of KK Hammond [KK]:  My new single Heart Shaped Box (featuring my good friends Kaspar ‘Berry’ Rapkin on banjo and lead guitar & Ian Davidson on cello) with a remixed and remastered version of my 2021 single ‘In the Pines’ on the B side will be released on the 27th of October and is available now for pre-save on digital music platforms or pre-order on a beautiful, blood splatter finish, limited edition 7” vinyl. Next year I will be offering the second pressing of my vinyl ‘Death Roll Blues’ for sale and am currently in the studio cooking up a couple of brand new singles for release in 2024!

1 In Music: Thank you for inviting us into your musical woods. Before we leave you, can please you tell us where to find your music?

KK: You can find my music on most major platforms and vinyl runs are sold directly from my website linked below. My upcoming single Heart Shaped Box / In the Pines can be pre-saved online at https://ffm.to/11dvxkv or pre-ordered on vinyl at https://thecurseofkkhammond.com/heart-shaped-box.

I’d like to say a big, kind thanks for this interview! 😊

https://thecurseofkkhammond.com

Pam Ross: Interview with the multi-award winning musician

Pam Ross: Interview with the multi-award winning musician

Meet Pam Ross

I was born in Pittsburgh, PA but lived most of my life in Houston, TX.  I launched my music career in Houston where I first exposed the world to my original songs through open mic venues.

I moved to Fuquay Varina, NC in June of 2020 during the pandemic.  In 2023, I began releasing songs from my album, When Therapy Fails.  My music defies any one genre because it’s filled with influences from Rock, Country, Americana, and Pop.  Three of my singles have reached the top ten on numerous rock and country indie charts and received airplay on radio stations.  The video for my single Fire In the Hole has won three music video awards and is up for best music video in the Carolina Film Festival.

1 In Music e-met Pam Ross for an exclusive tête-à-tête.

The Sound of Pam Ross’s music

[Making music] is the only place where I feel whole… like I belong.

1 In Music: What is unique about you and your music?

Pam Ross [PR]: Although I’m classified as Americana, my music really spreads across different genres.   As you listen to my album, you’ll notice one song may lean Country, the next leans Rock, another is bluesy, while some songs blend everything at once.  You really don’t know what you’re going to get from one song to the next with me.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

PR: The different styles of music I listened to growing up shaped my music a lot.  My mom was into classic Country while my older siblings were into Rock and Pop.  As I grew older, I got into Heavy Metal and Grunge.  My music was shaped by everyone from Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton to Elton John, Van Halen, Springsteen, Pink Floyd, R.E.M, Nirvana, Stevie Ray Vaughn, even the Bee Gees. I listen to everything.

My wife really supports me a lot.  She’s a good voice of reason and is behind my music 100%.

1 In Music: When did you realize you were going to make music professionally?

PR: It’s just something that I always knew.  Nothing else fit for me.  It’s the only place where I feel whole… like I belong.  I’ve done other things, but it never felt right.  I would always be thinking about music.

Talking inspirations with Pam Ross

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

Pam Ross [PR]: Like I said earlier, I listen to wide range of music.  I mainly listen to rock and country music.

Tony Arata is a songwriting genius

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

PR: Wow, that’s a tough one.  Someone who comes to mind is Tony Arata.  He’s a songwriter and he’s released some albums.  He wrote The Dance performed by Garth Brooks, Here I Am by Patty Loveless and a lot of other hit country songs.  I often get asked who he is when I tell people he’s one of my favorite songwriters.  Tony is a songwriting genius.  He’s got all these hit songs under his belt, but many people don’t know who is.

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

Pam Ross - Suggs 10PR: I look at the venue I’m playing at, the audience, start picking songs for the set list.  I rarely stick to my set lists, but I make them.  I’m always practicing so I sound the best I can.

Getting some wisdom and inspiration from Pam Ross

Work hard, Work smart

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

Pam Ross [PR]: I run and lift weights.  I love working out and making healthy food.  I’m a health nut.

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

[Success is] Being able to make a living playing music.

PR: I don’t have to have 20 million in the bank.  Success is being able to say I play music for a living…and yes, I can pay all my bills.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

Pam Ross 2023 08 19

PR: There are two things.  First, work hard.  I see a lot of bands / artists who don’t work that hard.  They learn a bunch of cover songs, practice once or twice a week and think they’re going to take over the music world. They don’t put a lot of energy into writing original music and creating something that sets them apart from everyone else.  I put six to eight hours a day into my music.  I understand that not everyone has that much time, but you really need to put at least a couple hours a day into writing, working on social media, and creating your brand.

Second, work smart.  You can bust your ass playing gigs five days a week but that doesn’t mean you’re going to get people to stream or buy your music.  I learned that you need the right people in your corner if you’re truly going to make a successful living playing music.  You need to get your music in front of the right people who have connections to get you to that next level.  For example, I knew a major label like Sony records wouldn’t look at me. I just released three songs from my album and streams were so-so.  However, I knew an indie label would.  I began researching indie labels and found Drop Track.  I submitted a couple of my songs to indie labels on their site and heard back from MTS two days later.  My music immediately began taking off after signing with them.  MTS has made a huge difference in my career and helped me get to that next level, but I had to do research and seek them out.  I got into a BMI songwriter showcase in Austin.  I found out about these events and knew how huge they could be for my career.  It took some hard work to get in the show, but I did it.  People ask me how I get so lucky and it kind of makes me mad.  I’m not lucky.  I work hard and think outside the box.  I have a vision for where I want to be and look for avenues to get there.  I don’t wait for anyone to come looking for me.  I go searching for the people who I know can help me accomplish my goals.

What’s next for Pam Ross?

Any upcoming projects?

Pam Ross [PR]: Right now, it looks like I’ll be going back into the studio in October to start work on my next album.  Although I’ll be releasing songs from my current album until April 2024, but I don’t want to rush my next project.  I also want something ready to release when I’m finished releasing music from this record.

Thank you, Pam! Before we leave you in peave, where can we find you music?

PR: You can find my music anywhere you buy or stream music. You can also find it Pamrossmusic.com.

https://pamrossmusic.com/

Jeremy Parsons interview after he releases Life Worth Dyin’ For

Jeremy Parsons interview after he releases Life Worth Dyin’ For

Remember musician Jeremy Parsons?

We have had the pleasure of interviewing Jeremy Parsons before and we are lucky to get to talk to the frequent chart-topper again and see how much he has achieved and evolved since, as a crafter and a practitioner of music. We catch him after the release of his new single Life Worth Dyin’ For, a preview of which you  can hear right here.

Jeremy Parsons is best known for his captivating performances and honest lyrics. His lyrics have been described as “keenly perceptive and meaningful.” Parsons’ songs have been featured on the Roots Music Report, IndieWorld Report, and Hits You Love Pop Charts, as well as National Radio Hits and New Music Weekly. His videos have also been selected for numerous film festivals, such as the Jersey Shore Film Festival, Munich Music Video Awards, Rome Music Video Awards, and others.

While we will be asking the same question, there is something magical and inspiring about the way an artist views the same things from the new perspective allowed to him by the constant practice of his art and the artistic emancipation that undoubtedly follows.

Jeremy Parsons and his music

1 In Music: What is unique about you and your music?

Jeremy Parsons [JP]: One thing I can say without a doubt is my voice. It stands out as my own, so people have told me. It’s always one of the most flattering things people tell me. It’s nice when they say they like the songs and my writing, but having a unique voice carries it further as they listen and are willing to listen and notice. Other than that, I let the art lead me to what’s next—usually, the creation process guides by itself, so the sounds change from project to project. I don’t know how unique that is, though it could be everyone’s creative flow.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

JP: My experiences have shaped me and my music. Whether it was listening to a song on the radio, my Dad telling me a story, or someone I loved hurting me deeply. That’s what shapes it all; if I had to immediately pick a writer or artist that stands out as an apparent influence, though not always center stage throughout my childhood, I would say Hank Williams Sr. I think he was the first artist that struck me long before I ever considered doing this myself. The biggest supporter of my entire life and my career is my father. He’s been in my corner since day one and was always nice enough to help nurture my craft and provide significant, honest feedback.

1 In Music: When did you realize you were going to make music professionally?

JP: I realized later than most. I was seventeen when I started writing, but it wasn’t until I was about eighteen that I went out and played my first show. It was a writer’s night at Rolling Oaks Sports Bar hosted by Larry Mofle, a constantly supportive friend and fellow artist. I didn’t expect anyone to care or even like it, but everyone was excellent. It made me want to keep going, and I haven’t stopped since.

Jeremy Parsons’ inspirations

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

Jeremy Parsons [JP]: I listen to all kinds, to be honest. I have been browsing through a lot of Americana lately. I’ve felt in the spirit to see where everyone is creatively around the genre. I gravitate back towards Tom Petty, John Prine, and Jason Isbell quite a bit.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

JP: Easily Weird Al Yankovich. The man perfectly rewrites other people’s songs and sometimes makes them better than the original. He may not be undervalued. He did have a movie, after all. I respect what he does, and it would be amazing to see him play the Super Bowl half-time one year. He’s done so many versions of so many songs it would be amazing.

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

Jeremy Parsons performance shotJP: I like to listen to an audiobook and go somewhere else before my shows, especially if I have to drive a long way to get there. I usually do vocal warmups occasionally in the car, too. I don’t have any exact ritual, though. I’m so at home playing shows and setting up at this point that it feels natural.

Jeremy Parsons, inspiring us

[Music is] a tough gig and made for those passionate about the craft and creating art

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) that you are passionate about?

Jeremy Parsons [JP]: I enjoy traveling and exploring areas when I can. One of the other benefits of this job is that it often takes me places I may have never been, and I can find exciting spots before my shows or go off somewhere cool if I have a down day. It’s always a joy finding a new restaurant or a park to sit at and be for a little while.

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

JP: I have consistently been able to do this as my full-time job for thirteen years. I think the goal is to keep growing, even if it’s step by step. Progress is progress, and moving forward is that for me. Whether that’s changing my sound slightly, not continuing to do the same thing every time, or booking more shows. That is a success, and I feel fulfilled in every accomplishment.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

JP:

Don’t throw yourself into this industry or lifestyle unless you know yourself because it will find a way to bury who you are, and you might have to dig yourself back out.

I was lucky enough to have a firm understanding of who I was in many important ways when I started, so I consider myself one of the lucky ones, but I have seen this industry take and use your dreams against you, and some people never come back from that. It’s unfortunate and authentic, and your previously asked question of success should be analyzed on your way into the entertainment arena and met with rational expectations. It’s a tough gig and made for those passionate about the craft and creating art.

What is next for Jeremy Parsons?

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

Jeremy Parsons [JP]: I just had a new song released on August 18th, “Life Worth Dyin’ For.” It’s the third single off an EP entitled Life, set to come out one single at a time. More music will be coming soon, but for now, “Life Worth Dyin’ For” is doing well, and I’m grateful for its reception and so overjoyed that everyone loves the track as much as we loved making it and sending it out to the world.

1 In Music: Thank you so much for this interview, Jeremy. Last but by no means least, where do we find your music?

JP: You can find my music anywhere under Jeremy Parsons, and I would appreciate you going and spinning and sharing the new single “Life Worth Dyin’ For.” My name and the song title are all you need. Let me know what you think.

http://www.jeremyparsonsmusic.com

Sarantos: An interview with the prolific multi-charts topper

Sarantos: An interview with the prolific multi-charts topper

Sarantos: Who says nerds can’t make hit music?

Sarantos is a Chicago-based nerd and retired superhero who always has a story to tell. He is a DIY international award-winning solo music artist, Top 7 iTunes UK Charting Rock, Top 5 iTunes UK Charting Singer-Songwriter, Top 8 iTunes UK Charting Country, #1 iTunes South Africa Charting Folk & Country Artist, #1 iTunes UK Charting Christian, #1 iTunes UK Charting New Age, #2 iTunes UK World, proud nerd, multi-instrumentalist, book author, comic book nut, radio show host, poet and part time spy. His music is a cross between Justin Bieber, Queen, Journey & Ed Sheeran.  He’s an alien who landed here to infect the human race and spread the disease of music. 2023 is Year #10 of his journey as he continues to release a new song, lyric video, music video,book chapter and poem every month bringing his music to life! In 9 years, he has released 18albums with 226 original tracks as well as 9 fiction/fantasy books that parallel the songs! Well, 1 In music was curious to interview this exceptional human and artist.

Sarantos and music

1 In Music: About your relationship with music…

Sarantos [S]: I believe music is important because music is the heartbeat of my soul. Anytime I am happy or sad, music is always there for me. My life would be so difficult without music and it has always been there for me – in my darkest hour or in my brightest moment. It never judges me, it never ignores me, it just soothes my soul and allows me to be the best version of myself every minute of every day.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

S: I have undergone several personal challenges in the last few years but my dad’s passing away in 2010 after a long, hard-fought battle with lung cancer really put me over the edge. I had also personally dealt with some health issues like asthma and allergies, which severely affected my singing style. After mourning my father’s death for a long time, I woke up one day and decided that the timing was finally right. This was always my lifelong dream and I was tired of doing nothing about it and watching life pass me by.  My main inspiration, however, is to raise money for charity. A nice chunk of any music related sales go straight to charity!

1 In Music: When did you realize you were going to make music professionally?

S: After my dad died.

Sarantos music video cant sleep (47)Sarantos: The artist’s inspiration

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

S: Everyone and anything I can get my hands on. Ed Sheeran’s my man crush.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

S: Me?

1 In Music: 🙂 How do you prepare for your performances?

S:

Rehearsal rehearsal rehearsal. If you’re well prepared, the performances are the easy part.

Digging a little deeper in the artist’s life and thoughts

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

S: I’m involved in many things. Obviously I have a day job. Other than that being a typical nerd, reading comic books, working out, going for long walks and bike rides. I no longer do triathlons and marathons, but I try to stay as active as I can. I love being outdoors with nature.

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

S:

[Success is] Being happy with what I do every day, hoping to touch a fan every day, in a positive way, to inspire them and make their day a little bit better.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

S: Ask yourself if this is a job or hobby for you. Adjust your goals and workflow accordingly. Sleep well, workout, meditate and have time to yourself. It’s not 100% music all the time. Enjoy your friends and family. Your brain, ears and mind need a break. Take it. It will help you focus more.

What next for Sarantos?

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

S: I am currently working on my next music video launch.  I just had a song place on the top 10 in the UK for iTunes on the charts. It’s going to be an exciting year!!

1 In Music: Where do we find you music?

S: Here are some links where for free, you can listen to the song and view the video:

My website below, and my Youtube, Apple MusicSpotify, Pandora, Deezer, Facebook artist page, TwitterInstagram, Tik Tok (@sarantos), LinkedIn, , Soundcloud, Tumblr, Vimeo, Reverbnation as well as:

http://www.melogia.com

Sleep well, workout, meditate and have time to yourself. It’s not 100% music all the time. Enjoy your friends and family. Your brain, ears and mind need a break. Take it.

Meet accomplished songwriter and musician Tim Tye of Midnight Sky

Meet accomplished songwriter and musician Tim Tye of Midnight Sky

Meet Tim Tye of Midnight Sky

Meet Tim Tye, a talented songwriter and musician, hailing from the vibrant city of Dayton, Ohio. Ever since his teenage years, Tim has been pouring his heart and soul into his music, especially through his skillful guitar playing. Drawing inspiration from the rich Country and Americana traditions, Tim’s original material has been beautifully showcased in three remarkable albums: “Dark Stretch of Road,” “A Few Good Years,” and his latest release, “Last Hope for the Modern World.”

Midnight Sky: where did all of it start?

Tim Tye from Midnight Sky1 In Music: What is unique about you and your music?

Tim Tye [TT]: I suppose all music is unique unless it’s plagiarized. My, or any artist’s, work is unique, because it draws on the life experiences of the artist, and no two people have identical life experiences.

1 In Music: It is certainly the case for authentic artists such as yourself! So, what or who shaped your music and who supports you?

TT: I attended college in the early 70s, which was a great period for popular music. I had roommates who loved music. Listening to each other’s stuff broadened our understanding and appreciation of music we hadn’t already heard. I’m supported by a growing and loyal fanbase.

1 In Music: When did you realize you were going to make music professionally?

TT: 2009. I decided it was time to start producing some of my material, instead of just thinking about it.

The birth of a sound

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

Tim Tye [TT]: Mostly oldies, I suppose. I really like Underground Garage and Outlaw Country on XM.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

TT: Let me give you two: Curtis Eller and His American Circus; The Blasters.

Tips and inspiration fron Tim Tye of Midnight Sky

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

I worry about whether my guitars will stay in tune.

1 In Music: lol. What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

I’m still practicing law. I have a few other interests, but nothing compares with my passion for music.

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

Tim Tye from Midnight Sky TT:

[Success to me is] Having another artist record some of my material. I would love to hear someone else’s interpretation.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out? 

TT: Don’t spend your life playing in a garage band. It’s a great way to start out, but ultimately your goal should be to create, not copy.

What is next from Tim Tye and Midnight Sky?

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

Tim Tye [TT]: I’ve been spending some time in the studio, but right now I’m putting most of my energy into promoting the new project: “Last Hope For The Modern World.”

1 In Music: Wow, a dramatically catchy title. Thank you for this interview but before we leave you, where will we find this upcoming project and the rest of your music?

TT: It’s on all streaming services. The best way is to search for Last Hope For The Modern World.

www.midnightskymusic.com