An interview with multi-talented musician Noah Fabray

An interview with multi-talented musician Noah Fabray

Noah Fabray is a multi-talented music producer and recording artist based in Scottsdale, Arizona. The musician has amassed millions of streams on Spotify, Apple Music, and beyond. Fabray has released music across all genres, ranging from Dream Pop to House, all the way to classic R&B. It seems that there is nothing that the artist cannot do. 1inMusic meets with the multifaceted talent.

1 in Music: What is unique about you and your music?

Noah Fabray [NF]: My music is 100% mine. I write all my lyrics, make my beats, and even play the piano. I like my songs to make people feel seen, heard, and empowered. Whether it’s R&B, Pop, Hip Hop, or something in between, I want my songs to sound fresh and exciting. My newest song, ‘Miami’, is refreshing in the best way and will have everyone tapping along. Definitely the song of the summer.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

NF:

My music has always been a safe space for me.

Noah Fabray

I started singing early on and have always admired powerhouse artists, like Mariah Carey, Amy Winehouse, Jennifer Hudson, and the list goes on. My family has

my back, and has always loved me for who I am: whatever that is.

1 In Music: When did you realise you were going to make music professionally?

NF: I knew I wanted to make music professionally when I was living in Los Angeles right after high-school. It’s always been my thing.

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

NF: Mostly Pop, R&B, and Dance. Anything good to be honest.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

NF: [The most undervalued artist is] MARIAH F***ING CAREY. The icon we all need to appreciate and RESPECT. She’s everything.

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

NF: I don’t! I just go out and lose my mind. Life’s too short to be scared of people who paid to see you.

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

NF: I write, I paint, I redecorate my room every other month, travel, take photos, and go outside!

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

NF: [Success, to me, is] Being happy. Being healthy. Not worrying about the numbers or the fame. Just making quality songs.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

NF: NUMBERS DON’T MATTER.

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

NF: I have a new song in the works as we speak, and plenty of visuals coming across social media.

1 In Music: Thank you for answering our questions. Where do we find you music?

NF: You can find all my music here: https://songwhip.com/noah-fabray

https://distrokid.com/hyperfollow/noahfabray/miami-2

An interview with veteran drummer turned singer-songwriter Chris Poulson

An interview with veteran drummer turned singer-songwriter Chris Poulson

Chris Poulson is a talented singer and songwriter from Burbank, California. A seasoned musician, he has been in the music industry since the mid 1990s. His career progressed quickly to being signed with Fearless Records rock band, Rock Kills Kid as drummer in 2001. Chris found himself touring and sharing the stage with headlining acts. Now focusing on singing and song writing, Chris recently released “Fall Into Pieces,” his debut Solo EP.

A unique musical portrait

1 In Music: What would you say is unique about you and your music?

Chris Poulson [CP]: I would have to say my voice is definitely one that does not blend in with the typical voices you may hear on radio or television. The music I write typically stems from my past experiences, even back to my childhood years. It consists of writing music, melodies, and lyrics that connect and resonate with people from all different ages and backgrounds.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

CP: The first band that really caught me in my feels was Nirvana. It was undeniable how much I loved listening to that band. From Kurt’s raspy singing and the genius behind his lyrics, to Dave Grohl’s hard hitting, straight-forward, and in-the-pocket style of drumming. Nirvana had me hooked! I would then learn as many Nirvana songs on drums and guitar as I possibly could. So, it’s safe to say that the Grunge era definitely shaped me as a musical artist. I then got into Punk Rock and Pop Punk which taught me different elements in music, speed, dynamics, vocal melodies and harmonies… you name it.

I’d say my biggest supporter throughout my musical journey has been my Mother. She is actually the reason why I became a lead singer to begin with. When I was a drummer I would sing backup vocals and sometimes would even sing lead for a song or two while playing the drums… and, I loved it. It wasn’t until years and years into my drumming career that I found out my Mom had developed Thyroid Cancer. My Mom was a singer in her own right, since a very young age and up until she got cancer, then that all got stripped away from her. That devastated her, and devastated me also.

So, I said to myself; “Chris, you have to carry on this voice you were given, not just for you, but for Mom.”

And, from that point on, I became a full-time singer-songwriter and haven’t looked back since.

1 In Music: Wow! So, let’s go back a little. When did you realise you were going to make music professionally?

CP: After High School, I went to a community college where I wanted to study psychology and music theory. I remember sitting in my psych class when I got a voicemail message on my cell from my buddy telling me to call him ASAP. So, I stepped out of the class for a minute to call him up. He explained there was this band that just signed a deal with Fearless Records and they lost their drummer in the middle of their deal. They were in need of a drummer that could learn their songs and finish recording their debut EP set to release on Fearless Records the following year. My friend thought I would be a perfect fit for this.

I knew exactly who Fearless was, and that alone had me so excited, I could barely contain myself. My friend gave me the number of the band’s bass player and told me to call him ASAP. So, I ended up going back inside the classroom, gathered up my belongings and took off back home so that I could get in touch with this band my friend was telling me about. Once I got home I called their bassist who gave me three songs to learn over the span of a week or so. We set-up an audition date, and I was pumped for this. I listened to those three songs day in and day out, drilling them into my head. I even slept with those songs playing over and over in my headphones.

It came down to audition day. I don’t remember being nervous, but I do remember saying to myself, “I want this, I NEED this!” I played those three songs with them like I had been playing with them for years. I even shocked myself. But, I had to prove to myself that I could do it. At the end of the audition, I remember the guitarist/lead singer and bassist stepped out to talk. They came back in minutes later and offered me the gig. That’s when I knew it was time for the big-leagues, and music would become my profession.

More on Chris Poulson – Music habit

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

CP: When I was a child, my parents (especially my Mom) loved Country music. So, I was around and listened to Country for many many years up until I reached middle school. Once I hit high school I started listening to Grunge. Then, it went on to Punk Rock and Pop Punk for many years thereafter. When I got a little older, Rock music took precedence over anything else. Now, I listen to a combination of anything. Rock, Alternative and even Pop music are my main go-tos these days. However, I still throw on some Grunge and Pop Punk to take me back to when I first started. I just love music in general, to any style, language, rhythm, beat, you name it.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

CP: In my personal opinion, it would be the band/artist Silverchair. Daniel Johns is a fantastic singer-songwriter, and Silverchair, as a band, is just crazy good. I’ve had the rare pleasure of seeing them live twice when they came to Los Angeles to play, and I was absolutely blown away. To this day, Silverchair is a huge influence on my song writing,

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

CP: First, I do not speak very much for an entire week, keeping my speaking to a minimum. Also, I try not to put myself in places where I need to speak over loud noises, people, etc.
I consume a lot of water and teas. I do not drink any alcohol before a performance, and I try to get plenty of rest.

Life Philosophy

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

CP: I am an avid long-distance runner. I have been running for over 20 years and I love it. And, I love fixing things around the house, e.g., repainting and repairing things that are broken, etc.

1 In Music: Wow! So, Success to you is…

CP: Being Happy and Enjoying what you do. Sometimes the freedom to do what you want and play what you want isn’t always an option. But,

as long as you’re able to express yourself and be the Real YOU, then happiness is bound to carry through your musical journey.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out

CP: I, at times wished I was told that this world isn’t exactly all sunshine and rainbows. It can be pretty tricky and have some surprises that can come out of nowhere, However,

you just have to be aware, expect the unexpected and do your job and do it well to the best of your ability.

And, no-one can deprive you from that.

About “Fall into pieces” and beyond

1 In Music: You are promoting your debut single, Fall into Pieces. Talk to us about how that came about and how it was fashioned.

CP: Right after I put the sticks down and decided that singing and song writing was going to be my main focus. My song, “Fall into Pieces” came to life then and there, following my previous band’s disbandment.

I ended up writing another song to follow called, “Break Free”. I then co-wrote “Joyride” and added that song to the mix. I hit the recording studio shortly after to start my journey as a solo artist.

Putting the sticks down was an important move for me to not only show the world what I have to offer as a singer-songwriter and front man, but to follow what it is I knew I was put on this earth to do.

1 In Music: “Fall into Pieces” is also the title track of your debut EP. Tell us more about that collection of songs.

CP: In May of 2021, I released my debut solo 3-song EP, “Fall into Pieces”. I hoped to evoke a rollercoaster of emotions to listeners. It is almost like getting lost in your own thoughts. For me, it’s like driving through a dark wooded forest and all you see is the road ahead. Oblivious to everything surrounding you.

“Fall into Pieces” represents the EP where the listener can connect from life experience. We have all felt hurt, pain, and sorrow. Yet, life goes on. The title track wraps up the 3-track EP in a way that sparks a little fire inside of you. I worked with producer and engineer, David Julson-Rieley, who also contributed to some of the arrangements, musical components and lyrics to each track.

‘Fall into Pieces’ EP emerged after a long break from the music world. I toyed with the idea for several years of getting back out into the live scene again and doing what it is I love to do.
I suppose releasing the EP gave me the motivation I needed to make that happen. Thanks to it, 2022 is looking bright, and you can definitely expect to see more of me in the coming months, along with a new single coming the Summer of 2022, music videos, press, and much much more.

1 In Music: We were just about to ask you about any upcoming projects?

CP: I am recording a brand new single June of 2022. This song has been under my belt for quite a while, and now it’s time for the world to hear it. I’m also gearing up for music videos to follow, as well as live shows later this Summer.

1 In Music: Thank you for taking this interview with us. Where can we find your music?

CP: You can find my music on basically any online streaming platform. You name it, it’s on there: Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music, YouTube, SoundCloud, Deezer, etc.

https://www.instagram.com/chris__poulson/

 

The Suicide Notes release new EP Trampstamp   

The Suicide Notes release new EP Trampstamp   

UK rock band The Suicide Notes release the exciting new EP Trampstamp. Recorded with Stu Jones at the helm at Woodworm Studios, and mastered by Wildhearts and Professionals producer Dave Draper. The EP is the long awaited follow up to their ‘Pleasures of Despair’ EPs.

“The Suicide Notes ooze gutter-trash rock n’ roll. Low-slung buzzsaw guitars and raw nicotine-soaked vocals, rock ‘n’ roll swagger, and whiskey on the rocks; the illegitimate sons of punk and sleaze, conceived on a bed of red wine, cigarettes, and back alley attitude.”

Born under the bad sign of guttercat rock n’ roll in 2019, the band swiftly secured management and a sponsorship deal with Cloven Hoof Rum before launching two acoustic singles – which have had continuous radio play since their release in July 2019. These were soon followed up with a third well received single ‘Momma Sang The Blues’ and the release of their debut acoustic and electric ‘Pleasures Of Despair’ EPs. These gained rave reviews across the board and the band were No.1 on Only Rock Radio in Spain, and No. 16 across all stations on the Radio Indie Alliance Top 40.
The gig calendar for 2020 was all-but wiped out by the Covid 19 pandemic, but not before the band had garnered stellar reviews for their debut gig at London’s Hope & Anchor, and for performances at the Dublin Castle, Camden’s Unicorn, and Dementia Aware Fest in Wolverhampton. Securing a new management deal with Forge A.M.P and adding the extra sonic assault of second guitarist Danny Gould, the Suicide Notes were widely acknowledged as one of the Day 1 highlights of the rescheduled HRH Sleaze 2021, along with a number of festival appearances, support slots with Last Great Dreamers, Healthy Junkies ans a bunch of headline shows.

2022 sees a return to Hard Rock Hell with a headline appearance at HRH AOR, a support slot with ‘Greatest Rock n’ Roll Band In The World’ Supersuckers, and festival appearances at RoadRage, CC7 XIII Shades of Black, Mayors Fest, and a third Punk n’ Roll Rendezvous, plus a return to multiple Dementia Fest 2021 events.

You can hear their songs on Bandcamp (above) or Spotify (below) and find out more about the band and their sound or follow them on:
Facebook  – www.facebook.com/thesuicidenotesuk
Instagram – @thesuicidenotesband
Twitter – @SuicideNotesUK

An interview with cross-culture mashup master Daydreamix

An interview with cross-culture mashup master Daydreamix

Daydreamix is a Moroccan Independent Music producer. The artist has showcased a great mastery in the science of doing mashups. He started back in 2015 by doing Covers (Vocals and Instrumentals) and Instrumentals only, and sharing them on YouTube. Today, he specializes in doing mashups between songs from completely heterogeneous cultures, languages and genres. Moroccan songs are the pillars of each of his mashups.

1 In Music: What is unique about you and your music?

Daydreamix [D]: When it comes to what is unique about me, I would say that I have an unconventional way of thinking, a growth mindset and according to what people say about me, I’m rigorous with a cartesian thinking and I have a good sense of humour.

When it comes to what is unique about my music (mashups for the moment), I would say that it is the fact that my mashups are seamless to the point that if you don’t know that the song you listening to is a mashup, you can think that this is a “normal” song really featuring the artists right there on the mashup! In addition, contrarily to mashups done by other artists, I don’t do it the easy way (i.e. Mashup’s verse = song 1 verse/Mashup’s chorus = song 2 chorus, for example), instead, I mix the verses of different songs, the choruses of different songs, so you can feel the mashup vibes at any time of the mashup.

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

D: I’m known to be a big fan of Coldplay, so this incredible Pop/Alternative Rock band had definitely shaped many aspects of my music taste and choices.

I have a big support from my family and close friends, I’m grateful for it.

1 In Music: When did you realise you were going to make music professionally?

D: You never know when it comes exactly. I mean it doesn’t come generally at a specific time of a specific day. It’s a relatively long unconscious process which leads you there. For me, I think it started the first time I decided to learn how to play piano (I’m still an amateur), and it was formally decided early 2019 when my artist name “Daydreamix” was born.

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to especially with you doing so many mashups?

D: I know it’s cliché to say this, but I would listen to any kind of music as long as it’s good music to my ears. So what makes a piece of music good in my opinion? Melody (of the vocals) and the instrumental. If at least one of these 2 is not perfect, then I can’t listen to it. You may notice that I didn’t mention the lyrics (although they are an ingredient of good music too), because I think they come last, musically speaking. In terms of countries, I listen to Moroccan, French, American, South American, German and sometimes Indian songs.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

D: In Morocco, [an undervalued artist] would be a singer called Issam Harris. He has an unconventional style of music, almost mixing different genres in one new genre.

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

D: I’ve done few performances so far, but I’m planning to do some live mini shows in the near future. I’m still preparing for it. I will tell you more about it when all the logistics and technical questions are handled, maybe in a future interview.

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

D: I usually hang out with friends, exercice (in the gym or at home), read/listen to an audio book or watch some videos on YouTube on specific topics. I’m passionate about Personal Development, Philosophy, Video shooting and Video editing.

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

D: The definition of Success is personal to each individual (i.e. a Success for me, can be perceived as a failure to others, and vice-versa). That being said, for me, the measure of Success is relative to how much you stick to your Purpose in life, on a daily basis. So success for me is when I’m at each moment living my purpose and serving it, and moving towards it.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

D: – Read, read and read books on Personal Development and specific books related to Business

Surround yourself with friends who will uplift you and give you positive energy

Seek help/information from specialists when needed, instead of wasting time looking for it on your own

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

D: Of course! I will be releasing more and more new mashups. Also, I’m planning to do some videos outside, for YouTube, where I make strangers listen to my mashups and get their reactions.

1 In Music: Where do we find all those music projects?

D: For the moment, on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/Daydreamix. In the future, I will release my songs on streaming platforms.

An interview with up and coming artist Yona Marie

An interview with up and coming artist Yona Marie

Yona Marie is an up and coming artist from the Washington, DC area. As a session singer, writer, and producer that has worked with over 200 clients to provide high-quality jingles, singles, features, nursery rhymes, and DJ drops, she currently spends her time engulfed in creating and marketing new music, as well as creating helpful content for artists and musicians who share a similar plight of making their way through an ever-changing digital music world.

1 In Music: What is unique about you and your music?

Yona Marie [YM]: I write, sing, and produce most of my own music. I’m a one-girl band!

1 In Music: What or who shaped your music and who supports you?

YM: My family was a big influence on how much I center my life around music as an adult. I’m also heavily influenced by celebrity artists like Beyonce and India Arie.

1 In Music: When did you realise you were going to make music professionally?

YM: I realized I would make a career out of music after I graduated college and realized that non-music-related jobs just weren’t for me. I need to work with something in the creative world at the very least.

1 In Music: What type of music do you listen to?

YM: I listen to all types of music literally, but I favor R&B, Pop, EDM, Hip Hop, Gospel, Jazz, and Classical music.

1 In Music: Who, to you, is the most undervalued music artist?

YM: That’s a hard question to answer. Since there are so many options to name here, I’ll just say myself. Or many unsigned artists out there that are just like me in the sense that they have a special talent that most people don’t have the privilege to hear yet.

1 In Music: How do you prepare for your performances?

YM: I like to rehearse over and over so that I’m not too far in my head for a performance. I also go on voice rest for a day or so before a big performance so that I don’t suffer from any vocal fatigue.

1 In Music: What do you do when you don’t do music (creative or otherwise) and that you are passionate about?

YM: I’m also very passionate about entertainment in the form of games, books, and visual media. I love sci-fi shows, movies, and books so much that

I wish something huge in the world of science would happen in my lifetime and I can experience something like an alien or machine takeover.

I know that sounds crazy but it would be insane in the worst and best way.

1 In Music: Success to you is…?

YM: Success to me is doing what you love with as little limitation as possible while being able to help people at the same time. The more people you can help, the better.

1 In Music: What do you wish you were told when you started out and that you think would help anyone who starts out?

YM: I wish I was told that it’s not a bad thing to fail.
In my early years I was so afraid to fail and be embarrassed,
but failure is key to opening doors to success.

1 In Music: Any upcoming projects?

YM: I have a new single by the name of Insecure coming out in a few months. It will have a cool bossa nova vibe to it.

1 In Music: Where do we find you music?

YM: You can find my new releases on https://yonamariemusic.com/new-releases